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  Helping People with Macular Degeneration read again!

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Mountain View Showroom
1400 Terra Bella Avenue
Suite I
Mountain View, CA�94043
Tel: 650-961-6541


Contact Us
615 Tami Way
Mountain View, CA 94041
Tel: 800-961-1334
Fax: 650-968-4740
info@freedomvision.net
Desktops
Desktop Video Magnifiers 5 images

 

           
           Retain your independence and enhance your lifestyle
             with a desktop video magnifier from Freedom Vision



Who should have a desktop video magnifier?

Anyone with macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, cataracts, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and other vision conditions that cause a visual impairment whereby the person finds it inconvenient, difficult or impossible to use optical magnifiers to do their daily reading and writing tasks.  Desktop video magnifier models are considered stationary units (see Products � Portables to view portable video magnifiers).   

Most users of desktop video magnifiers are seniors with age-related macular degeneration.  However, the variety of visual impairments cross all age groups.   

What is a Video Magnifier?

Desktop video magnifiers are commonly used for reading and writing tasks like:

� Browse newspaper and magazine articles
� Sort your daily mail
� Read prescriptions on bottles
� Read recipes in the kitchen
� View photographs in vibrant color
� Write your own checks
� Address envelopes
� and many more daily living tasks

Variable Magnification
Unlike optical magnifiers, video magnifiers offer low vision user a wide range of magnification, often 3x  - 45x on a 14" screen and 4x - 60x on a 19" screen. Since many reading materials have several different print sizes on a page, the user can easily change the magnification to the required setting by the simple press on a button or turn of a knob. Today, almost all desktop video magnifiers are also auto focus cameras, which is one of the most helpful technology enhancements over the past several years.

Image Brightness
Besides magnification, proper lighting and good contrast are essential for someone coping with low vision. Video magnifiers feature the brightness and contrast of a video screen.  Many models offer adjustable brightness levels so the user may set their most comfortable brightness image   And, depending on the contrast of the print quality, paper quality or type, or font style of the reading material, the user may also want to vary the brightness setting   Most desktop video magnifiers feature built-in lighting, usually fluorescent light bulbs, to illuminate the reading area under the camera, however, some of the newer desktop models are featuring white LED lighting which provide a glare-free illumination and are long-lasting (100,000 hours of use), unlike fluorescent bulbs which cast glare and commonly last for 2,500 - 5,000 hours.  of use), unlike fluorescent bulbs which casts a glare and commonly operate for 2,500 to 5,000 of use.  Since many reading materials have several different print sizes on a page, the user can easily change the magnification to the required setting by the simple press on a button or turn of a knob. Today, almost all desktop video magnifiers are also auto focus cameras, which is one of the most helpful technology enhancements over the past several years.

Choice of Monitor Size
Desktop video magnifiers are available in a variety of monitor sizes.  The most common screen sizes are 14" or 15",17", 19" and 22" screens.  Most models feature an integrated display screen. The monitor is either �In-line� (meaning the display screen is located directly above the camera and x/y moveable table so the user sits directly �in-line�) or �side-by-side� (meaning the camera is positioned alongside the monitor).  Since the early 1980s,In-line desktop video magnifiers are the most popular models. The magnification range and field of view (how many vertical lines and horizontal letters are displayed on the screen) will vary slightly depending on the size of the screen.  Commonly, magnification will range from 4x � 50x on a 14" or 15" screen and from 4x � 60x on a 19"-22" screen.  Your choice of screen size is for most users more a personal choice rather than a vision decision.